beyond the surface

...what you don't know can kill what you know...

Gravity Sketch Tablet Lets You Draw In Mid-Air
MARK WILSON, fastcodesign.com
It lets you draw in 2-D and manipulate your design in 3-D.We’re stuck in an awkward spot. We can manufacture nearly any 3-D product we’d like. But these objects are trapped behind the 2-D computer screen we design them in.One solution is to …

“We can manufacture nearly any 3-D product we’d like. But these objects are trapped behind the 2-D computer screen we design them in.”

Gravity Sketch Tablet Lets You Draw In Mid-Air
MARK WILSON, fastcodesign.com

It lets you draw in 2-D and manipulate your design in 3-D.

We’re stuck in an awkward spot. We can manufacture nearly any 3-D product we’d like. But these objects are trapped behind the 2-D computer screen we design them in.

One solution is to …

“We can manufacture nearly any 3-D product we’d like. But these objects are trapped behind the 2-D computer screen we design them in.”

Because I’m beginning to detest school…I’ve been coding for 6 hour 😒 (at Ashesi University College)

Because I’m beginning to detest school…I’ve been coding for 6 hour 😒 (at Ashesi University College)

yiadomxog:

Akuaba - March 2014
Osei Karikari
"Akuaba are wooden ritual fertility dolls from Ghana and nearby areas. The best known akuaba are those of the Ashanti people, whose akuaba have large, disc-like heads.
Traditionally, these dolls are carried on the back of women either hoping to conceive a child, or to ensure the attractiveness of the child being carried. When not in active use, the akuaba would be ritually washed and cared for.” (Wikipedia)
This is a piece I did in high school for my Visual Art program. I took the original picture and played around with it in Adobe Illustrator, since I’m trying to experiment with digital art. Big thanks to Joseph Awuah-Darko for the help on this piece

yiadomxog:

Akuaba - March 2014

Osei Karikari

"Akuaba are wooden ritual fertility dolls from Ghana and nearby areas. The best known akuaba are those of the Ashanti people, whose akuaba have large, disc-like heads.

Traditionally, these dolls are carried on the back of women either hoping to conceive a child, or to ensure the attractiveness of the child being carried. When not in active use, the akuaba would be ritually washed and cared for.” (Wikipedia)

This is a piece I did in high school for my Visual Art program. I took the original picture and played around with it in Adobe Illustrator, since I’m trying to experiment with digital art. Big thanks to Joseph Awuah-Darko for the help on this piece

Insomniac.

mensahdemary:

The prevailing belief is that when one is single, you answer to no one but yourself. This sounds nice, like all truisms, and, with flowery, declarative language, this belief could take the shape of a quotable note reblogged and retweeted endlessly throughout the ether, echoing within this…